Assorted 1:18 scale diecast model cars by AUTOart

Contact us by email or phone to arrange purchase, see contacts page


Description Product Id Price
1:18 scale diecast model Porsche 911 GT3 RSR, LeMans GT2 Class Winner,2007 Narac/Lietz/Long

By Auto Art

A80771

  Click on the pictures for details.

For current exchange rates see http://www.xe.com

Nicely crafted in 1:18 scale by Autoart, this is the 2007 IMSA Porsche 911 GT3 RSR #76 as driven to victory at LeMans by Narac, Lietz, and Long. Highly detailed inside and out, features include opening doors, hood, trunk, workable steering, detailed engine, authentic tires/rims and more! $199 AUD

Email now to buy

In stock Now

Ask for a Delivery Quote

Click on the image for library 

   

1:18 Diecast scale model of the  Jaguar D Type 1955 Le Mans Winner Hawthorn and Bueb

by 

AUTOart

AA85586

For current exchange rates see http://www.xe.com

D-Types under the leadership of Jaguar's racing manager Lofty England were expected to perform well in their debut at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans race. Sold Out

 

Unfortunately the cars were hampered by fuel starvation problem due to their fuel filters, after their removal the entry driven by Hamilton and Rolt finished less than a lap behind the winning Ferrari. The D-Type's aerodynamic superiority was evident from its speed of 173 mph on the Mulsanne Straight compared with the more powerful Ferrari's 160 mph. For 1955 the cars were modified with long-nose bodywork and engines uprated with larger valves. At Le Mans, they proved competitive with the Mercedes-Benz 300 SLRs, which had been expected to win. Mike Hawthorn's D-Type had a narrow lead over Juan Manuel Fangio's Mercedes when another Mercedes team car was involved in the most catastrophic accident in motorsport history. Driver Pierre Levegh and more than 80 spectators lost their lives, while many more were injured. Mercedes withdrew from the race but Jaguar opted to continue, and the D-Type driven by Hawthorn and Bueb went on to win. Mercedes withdrew from motorsport at the end of the 1955 season, and Jaguar again entered Le Mans in 1956. Although only one of the three factory-entered cars finished, in 6th place, the race was won by a D-Type entered by the small Edinburgh-based team Ecurie Ecosse and driven by Ron Flockhart and Ninian Sanderson, beating works teams from Aston Martin and Scuderia Ferrari.

1:18 scale die-cast model by Auto Art

1953 Jaguar C-type, LeMans winner, Rolt/Hamilton

Beautiful model 

New in Box

A85387

Click on the picture for details.

The Le Mans 24 Hours of 1953 was a milestone for Jaguar. The company's C-types, equipped with revolutionary new disc brakes, were in a class of their own.


Sold Out

Beautifully done in 1:18 scale by Autoart, this is the Jaguar C-Type as driven to victory at Le Mans by Rolt and Hamilton. Features a fully detailed engine and under chassis, as well as an authentic interior and accurate wheels, tires & exhaust. 

Lotus 99T Senna

1:18 scale die-cast model by Auto Art

Lotus 99T Japan GP 1987 Ayrton Senna

 

New in Box

A88727

Click on the picture for details.

The Lotus 99T was designed by Gérard Ducarouge and powered by a Honda RA166-E turbocharged 1.5-Litre engine from 1986, due to Honda's existing deal with Williams allowing them exclusive use of the 1987 spec Honda RA167-E engine.


Sold Out
Lotus had also lost long time sponsor John Player Special who were replaced by Camel meaning the black cars with gold sign writing were replaced by bright yellow with blue sign writing.
Lotus 99T Senna Lotus 99T Senna Lotus 99T Senna
Beautifully crafted in 1:18 scale by Autoart, this is the 1987 Lotus 99T as driven at the Japan GP by Ayrton Senna. The model features a lift off engine cover to reveal the fully wired and plumbed motor, radiators, electonics, and more. Accurate cock pit, and authentic Lotus race day graphics. Sure to enhance your Senna collection.
1:18 scale diecast model Porsche 917K 1970 Le Mans Winner 

By Auto Art


A87087

 Click on the picture for details.

Another very significant Porsche race car in 1:18 scale by AUTOart. This is the 917K as driven to victory at Le mans in 1970 by Hans Hermann and Richard Atwood.


Sold Out 

 

The model features opening doors to show the authentic race interior, opening/removable front and rear bonnets to show the well detailed engine bay. Top it off with beautiful high luster paint and decoration. This one will fill that void in your Le Mans winners collection.  

Click on the picture for more photos.

   1:18 Diecast scale model of the Chrysler Valiant Charger E49

AA71506

For current exchange rates see http://www.xe.com

 

The Chrysler Valiant Charger was introduced by Chrysler Australia in 1971. It was a short wheelbase two door coupe based on the Australian Chrysler Valiant sedan and winner of the 1971 Australian Wheels Car of the Year Award. 

Sold Out 

 

The R/T (Road/Track) version carried through Chrysler's performance model from the VG Valiant Pacer range, the platform for Chrysler's participation in Australian touring car racing.  The Charger R/T used the base 265ci "HP" (high performance) 2bbl six-cylinder engine, was a peformance homologation version called the E37 which featured a tuned "Six Pack" version of the engine characterised by triple sidedraught twin choke Weber carburettors. Exclusively available for the R/T was a further tuned version, option E38, which formed the basis of Chrysler's touring car racer for 1971. The E38 option blessed the Charger R/T with 280 bhp and 3 speed manual transmission. In 1972, the option E49 was released with a more powerful (302 bhp) version of an E38 engine was mated to a four speed manual gearbox. This engine produced remarkable torque on a seven bearing configuration which enabled considerable power development previously unobtained from 6-cylinder engines and not surpassed until the Porsche 911 Turbo released in 1975

Click on the picture for more photos.

   1:18 Diecast scale model of the  Holden V2 Monaro CV8

For current exchange rates see http://www.xe.com

AA73352 Quick Silver 

Sold out

 

AA73488 Hot House Green

Sold out

 

AA73351 Devil Yellow Sold out

 

 

Holden designers were looking at the concept of a coupe version of the VT range as early as 1993. The proportions and the sleek lines of the VT were a natural for the coupe treatment. The Holden design team, headed by Mike Simcoe, who created the VT Commodore produced some beautiful renderings of how such a coupe could look. 
Sold Out  Mike Simcoe's team challenged traditional thinking and worked on the project in secret knowing that they would not get official funding at the concept stage. It may have been a dream in 1993 but the coupe went from an idea into a reality in under five months. In October 1998 at the Sydney Motor Show Holden unveiled the VT Commodore Coupe. In February 1999 Holden announced that the VT Coupe will go into production, the new Monaro coupe was born, the first example rolling off the assembly line in October, 2001 - a transition that would take only 22 months. The Monaro was about as close as a car could come to being an instant classic, resurrecting the name "Monaro" that many thought had been consigned to the annals of Aussie motoring history. Two versions were available, the supercharged V6 "CV6" and Gen III V8 powered CV8.

Specs: CV6  CV8

Click on the picture for more photos.

   1:18 Die-cast scale model of the  Holden Concept VT Commodore Coupe Limited Edition with Certificate of Authenticity

AA73432 

 

Holden designers were looking at the concept of a coupe version of the VT range as early as 1993. Sold Out Mike Simcoe's team challenged traditional thinking and worked on the project in secret knowing that they would not get official funding at the concept stage. It may have been a dream in 1993 but the coupe went from an idea into a reality in under five months. In October 1998 at the Sydney Motor Show Holden unveiled the VT Commodore Coupe. In February 1999 Holden announced that the VT Coupe will go into production, the new Monaro coupe was born, the first example rolling off the assembly line in October, 2001 - a transition that would take only 22 months. The Monaro was about as close as a car could come to being an instant classic, resurrecting the name "Monaro" that many thought had been consigned to the annals of Aussie motoring history. Two versions were available, the supercharged V6 "CV6" and Gen III V8 powered CV8.

Specs: CV6  CV8

Click on the picture for more photos.

   1:18 Die-cast scale model of the  HSV Holden VT2 Commodore Clubsport R8

AA73304 Herron White The 1999 HSV VT2 Clubsport R8 was much larger than  predecessors and boasted luxury features, with a CD player, leather steering wheel, powered seats and fog lights. Sold Out
The Game changer in was the 5.7L V8 LS1 Gen III engine, with peak output of 250kW 

   

1:18 scale die-cast  model of the Red Bull X2010 Concept F1 Road Car from Gran Turismo 5 

by 

AUTOart

AA18108

For current exchange rates see http://www.xe.com

AUTOart has recently announced a 1:18 diecast model of the Red Bull X2010 which is featured in the Gran Turismo 5 computer game. Given the brief of building a race car with no rules this is what Adrian Newey, Red Bull designer, came up with; top speed of 470 KPH and 6G cornering load, it has the dynamics of a fighter jet, in the simulator at least! Sold Out

 

Bentley Speed 8

1:18 scale die-cast model by Auto Art

Bentley Speed 8 2003, LeMans winner, Capello Kristensen, Smith.

Mint in Box

A80353

 Click on the picture for details.

Beautifully done in 1:18 scale by Autoart, this sealed body model of the Bentley Speed 8 is the bench mark for all other examples of this model.


Sold Out 
After three consecutive wins, the Audi factory team officially did not field a team, although several privateers did use R8 chassis. Bentley, with an Audi engine and support from Audi works team Joest Racing, won its first Le Mans title since 1930 in the Bentley Speed 8 and Danish driver Tom Kristensen set a record with his fourth straight victory. The Bentley team of David Brabham, Mark Blundell and Johnny Herbert finished second, ahead of the customer Audisis the Jaguar C-Type as driven to victory at Le Mans by Rolt and Hamilton. Features a fully detailed engine and under chassis, as well as an authentic interior and accurate wheels, tires & exhaust...More 
1:18 scale diecast model Mazda 787B 1991 Le Mans Winner 

By Auto Art

Special Edition


A89142

 Click on the picture for details.

For current exchange rates see http://www.xe.com

The Mazda 787 and its derivative 787B were Group C sports prototype racing cars built by Mazda for use in the World Sportscar Championship, All Japan Sports Prototype Championship, as well as the 24 Hours of Le Mans from 1990 to 1991.

Sold Out 

All Japan Sports Prototype Championship, as well as the 24 Hours of Le Mans from 1990 to 1991. Features of this model include opening doors and a removable front and engine covers to show the detailed mechanicals and engine .  Although the 787 and 787B lacked the single lap pace of World Championship competitors such as Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar, and Porsche, as well Japanese Championship competitors Nissan and Toyota, the Mazdas had reliability which allowed them to contend for their respective championships. The reliability of the cars eventually paid off in 1991 when a 787B driven by Johnny Herbert, Volker Weidler, and Bertrand Gachot went on to victory in the 1991 24 Hours of Le Mans. This remains as of 2011 the only victory by a Japanese marque as well as the only victory by a car not using a reciprocating engine design. A total of two 787s were constructed in 1990, while three newer specification 787Bs were built in 1991. 
1:18 scale diecast model Panoz Esperante GTR-1 Road Car

By Auto Art

A78202

  Click on the pictures for details.

The Panoz Esperante GTR-1 was developed by Panoz Auto Development and Reynard Motorsport for GT endurance racing in 1997.   

Sold Out

In order to meet homologation 
requirements, Panoz built two road-legal GTR-1s which featured full interiors and minor modifications to make it able to be legally registered. These cars were retained by Don Panoz and now features a smaller 5.3L V8 instead of 
the full 6.0L V8 race engine. The GTR-1 competed in the FIA GT Championship and 24 Hours of Le Mans as well as the IMSA GT. Don Panoz, wanting to keep an American-style of design, insisted that the car be based on his Esperante sports car. Like the production Esperante, the engine was located in front of the cockpit. Although located behind the front axle to give it a balanced mid-engine layout. For an engine Panoz turned to Roush Racing of NASCAR fame to construct 6.0L V8s based on Ford engines. For the 1997 24 Hours of Le Mans, three GTR-1s were entered by David Price and DAMS. Unfortunately none of the cars was able to finish, mostly due to engine difficulties. The Panoz factory team concentrated on 1998 Le Mans with their own two cars. Although one car failed to finish, the second entry managed to take a 7th place 
overall finish a mere 16 laps behind the overall winning Porsche.
1:18 scale diecast model Porsche 917K Le Mans movie car 

By Auto Art


A87183

 Click on the picture for details.

The most popular 1:18 scale model ever produced by Autoart. In the Steve McQueen series is the Porsche 917K, faithfully reproduced with impressive detail for this price range.  

Sold out

 

Just an all around great reproduction of the car that McQueen drove in the movie "Le Mans" Features include opening doors and a removable engine bonnet to show the engine area. "Racing is life! Anything that happens before or after is just waiting!" -Steve McQueen

1:18 scale die-cast model by Auto Art

Jaguar C Type 1951

Beautiful model 
JCT

Click on the picture for details.

Jaguar C-Type Wins LeMans 1951

The three XK120c LeMans cars were completed only about six weeks before the 1951 event, but that was time enough for Stirling Moss and Jack Fairman to do some testing. They uncovered little that needed changing.
 

Sold out

Jaguar's first racing job had been done well. So well that the Jaguar C-Type won its first-ever race, the race for which it had been designed, the most important sports car race in the world, the 24 Hours of Le Mans. A Jaguar driven by Moss came from a mid-field start to take the lead on the third lap, and eventually broke the lap record by six seconds, at 105.2 mph. The other two C-Types were going well, too, and in the fifth hour the novice team was running first, second, and third. But then, two cars were out with broken oil pipes. Greatly worried, management ordered the remaining car to slow down. Luckily, the strongest of the opposition had also faded, and the Jaguar driven by Peter Walker and Peter Whitehead was able to cruise home to victory at 93.49 mph, beating a Talbot by 67 miles. It was the first British victory at LeMans since Lagonda had managed the feat in 1935.
1:18 scale diecast model Jaguar XJ13

By Auto Art

 Click on the picture for details. The Jaguar XJ13 was a prototype developed by Jaguar to challenge at Le Mans in the mid-1960s. It never raced, and only one was ever produced.  

Sold out

The XJ13 had a 5 litre V12 engine mounted behind the driver, used as a stressed chassis member together with the five-speed  ZF Transaxle driving the rear wheels. Jaguar considered the V12 engine as far back as 1955, initially for racing purposes, and then developing a road going version, unlike the XK 6-cylinder engine, which was designed as a production engine and later pressed into service for racing. The V12 engine design was essentially two 6s on a common crankshaft with an aluminium cylinder block, with differences in the inlet porting, valve angles and combustion chamber shape. The first engine ran in 1964. The whole story

CV6 standard equipment included: Supercharged V6, 17 x 8 inch alloy wheels, 4 speed automatic transmission, security system, driver and front passenger airbags, driver and front passenger side impact airbags, control link independent rear suspension (IRS), Monaro FE2 Sports Suspension, ABS brakes, traction control, cruise control, basic trip computer, CD player, steering wheel audio controls, power antenna, power socket in centre console, twin cup-holders, air conditioning, power windows. You could option the CV6 with a Limited slip differential (LSD), Holden Assist security and support system.


CV8 standard equipment included, in addition to that listed for the CV6: V8, 18 x 8 inch alloy wheels, 6 speed manual transmission, Limited slip differential (LSD), advanced trip computer, 10-disc CD changer, climate control. Optional equipment included: 4 speed automatic transmission, Holden Assist satellite security and support system. On Series II also: Rear Park Assist, 6-disc in-dash CD changer.

The Jaguar XJ13 was a prototype racing car developed by Jaguar to challenge at Le Mans in the mid-1960s. It never raced, and only one was ever produced. Jaguar considered the V12 engine as far back as 1955, initially for racing purposes, and then developing a road going version, unlike the XK 6-cylinder engine, which was designed as a production engine and later pressed into service for racing. The V12 engine design was essentially two 6s on a common crankshaft with an aluminium cylinder block, with differences in the inlet porting, valve angles and combustion chamber shape. The first engine ran in 1964. The idea of a mid-engined prototype was first mooted in 1960, but it was not until 1965 that construction began, with the first car running by March 1966. The aluminium body was designed by Malcolm Sayer, the aerodynamicist responsible for the Jaguar C-type, D-type, E-type and XJS, who used his Bristol Aeroplane Company background to build it using techniques borrowed from the aircraft industry.

The XJ13 had mid-engine format with the 5.0 litre V12 engine mounted behind the driver, used as a stressed chassis member together with the five-speed manual ZF Transaxle driving the rear wheels. The front suspension wishbones were similar to that of the E-Type, however where the E-Type used longitudinal torsion bars, the XJ13 had more conventional coil spring/damper units. At the rear there again remained similarities with the E-Type - the use of driveshafts as upper transverse links - however the rest was quite different, with two long radius arms per side angling back from the central body tub together with lower links.

The development of the XJ13, although treated seriously by the designers, was never a priority for company management (despite assistant MD Lofty England's Le Mans success in the 1950s), and became less so following the 1966 merger with BMC. By that time Ford had developed the 7.0 litre GT40, and so the XJ13 was considered obsolete by the time the prototype was complete. The prototype was tested at MIRA and at Silverstone, which confirmed that it would have required considerable development to make it competitive. The prototype was put into storage and no further examples were made. In 1971 the Series 3 E-type was about to be launched with Jaguar's first production V12 engine. The XJ13 was taken out of storage to be filmed at MIRA for the E-type publicity video. Unfortunately, the magnesium wheels had suffered from internal corrosion and one disintegrated at speed, the car rolled heavily and was nearly destroyed. Jaguar test driver Norman Dewis was fortunately unharmed. The wreck of the car was put back into storage. Some years later, the car was rebuilt, to a specification similar to the original, using the body jigs made for its original construction. The cars is now displayed in the Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust collection.

The Bentley Speed 8 story - After three consecutive wins, the Audi factory team officially did not field a team, although several privateers did use R8 chassis. Bentley, with an Audi engine and support from Audi works team Joest Racing, won its first Le Mans title since 1930 in the Bentley Speed 8 and Danish driver Tom Kristensen set a record with his fourth straight victory. The Bentley team of David Brabham, Mark Blundell and Johnny Herbert finished second, ahead of the customer Audis.

The Bentley Speed 8, developed from the Bentley EXP Speed 8 was an Autosport Award Winning Le Mans Prototype race car that was designed by Peter Elleray. The EXP Speed 8 debuted in the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2001 and won the race in 2003. It has a strong resemblance to and shares some technology with the Audi R8C, which had raced only once before Audi dropped the project to focus on the later dominant Audi R8. The EXP Speed 8 marked Bentley's return to racing after a 73-year absence.

All design, development and manufacturing for the Bentley was done by the English outfit, Racing Technology Norfolk (RTN), located in Norfolk, United Kingdom. Chief designer was Peter Elleray.

The engine from the Audi R8, a 3.6 litre V8 with turbocharger, was used as the initial powerplant in 2001. The six-speed gearbox was also not the typical Ricardo unit from the R8, but instead a custom unit developed by Xtrac. Bentley also chose to run on Dunlop tyres instead of the Michelins used by Audi.

Following its initial year of competition, the Audi-sourced V8 was modified to better suit the EXP Speed 8. This saw the engine expanded to 4.0 litres, producing approximately 600 hp. This would ultimately lead to Bentley redesigning the car for 2003, leading to the change of name to simply Speed 8. The flat front end was replaced with a raised crash box for a nose, while deep valleys ran between the nose and fenders. This required the addition of large horizontal bodywork between the nose and fenders to shroud the suspension arms of the Speed 8. The cockpit would also be tapered to allow for better airflow to the rear wing. Bentley also decided to switch to Michelin tyres for their 2003 campaign.

Want More? Check The Collection